vendôr.

Vendôr. is a place for creators working with the hand-made.

We aim to make this a collective platform where makers from different backgrounds can display their work, alongside one-off hats we will be making from deadstock and antique fabrics, sourced and produced with care and respect for the materials. We will also be showcasing objects we have sourced in our travels.

Mariko Tsuchiyama

Mariko Tsuchiyama is a Japanese jewelry designer who works with rare and unusual pearls from the coasts of Japan and Tahiti.

Initially trained in silversmithing at Hiko Mizuno College of Jewelry in Tokyo then moved to London and studied at Central Saint Martins. At the same time, she worked for Spanish contemporary jewellery artist Marc Monzó, and English leather jewellery designer Rosita Bonita. Soon afterwards, her passion for making jewellery independently enabled Mariko to launch her own brand in 2012. 

She blends organic aesthetic contours with minimal delicate form and design. Inspired by the pure feeling and texture of nature – seeds, nuts, shells, stems, and the bare skin of women. 

In so doing, she makes poetic space at once a scene and a whisper – by leaving the pearls untouched, in their natural iridescent tones. Nature makes layers and Mariko reveals the inner beauty in her designs. Being based next to the sea in Brighton, her studio invokes creativity and the inspiration to continue create beautiful collections.

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Vendor

HAAT-ery. is a project examining archival headwear, a physical research derived from texts, images and findings. All fabrics employ techniques by hand; whether that be hand-dyeing with natural dyes, hand-waxing, hand-stitching, or reusing antique textiles collected with consideration. Fabrics have been made specifically for us within India and neighbouring regions, as ethically and sustainable as possible.

All hats are made in London with a small team of milliners. Every detail, from the lining to the threads is the result of ongoing research and learning. The imperfections of hand-crafted and aged fabrics accumulate with wear, allowing each piece to be individual.